Understanding When Reconstructive Plastic Surgery Is Needed

Sometimes an injury is so severe that you know you need surgery right away. If your finger or arm is severed in an accident, for instance, you hope that your doctor can reattach it and repair it well enough so that you can use it normally again.

But other conditions that seem less severe — such as carpal tunnel syndrome — or merely cosmetic — such as a ganglion cyst — may also benefit from reconstructive surgery.

The top-rated orthopedic and reconstructive plastic surgeons at the Arizona Center for Hand and Shoulder Surgery are experts at helping you regain optimal function and creating a healthy, normal appearance for your hands, arms, and fingers using cutting-edge techniques. In many conditions, getting reconstructive surgery sooner rather than later can mean the difference between fully or partially restored function.

When do you need reconstructive plastic surgery on your arm, hand, or fingers? The experts at Arizona  Center for Hand to Shoulder Surgery recommend you get medical attention as soon as possible in the following situations.

Your finger, thumb, or arm was severed

If your finger or arm was severed or partially severed in an occupational accident, motor vehicle accident, or by other means, get to the emergency room as soon as possible. If you’re conscious and able, wrap the amputated portion in wet gauze. Fingers and limbs must be reattached within six to 12 hours to have the best chance of restored function and viability.

Our board-certified, fellowship-trained reconstructive surgeons use the latest techniques to reattach severed limbs, including reattaching arteries and nerves. They correct both functional and cosmetic problems so your hand or arm not only works again, but looks as normal as possible.

You suffered other types of hand or arm injuries

Sometimes an injury or burn doesn’t seem like it’s going to affect your function, and so you delay getting treatment. Over time and due to having a more extensive injury that you realized or imperfect healing, you notice that your arm, hand, or fingers don’t work properly anymore.

If you injure your hands or arms playing sports, in a car accident, or during a fall or other accident, contact Arizona Hand and Shoulder Surgery for an evaluation. You may have torn ligaments or tendons that need to be repaired, have a pinched nerve that needs relief, or scarring that’s inhibiting movement.

You have functional problems

Whether from overuse and engaging in repetitive motions, or simply due to aging, you may develop pain, stiffness, or difficulty using your hands and fingers. When you notice that your fingers can’t grip the way they used to or movements that you once made freely are now painful or incomplete, you may have a condition such as:

In addition to reconstructive surgeries, our doctors also perform arthroscopic procedures and microsurgeries to restore function. Catching a condition early increases the chances of regaining full and optimal function.

If you were born with a congenital difference

Whether you were born with fused fingers (syndactyly) or bent fingers (arthrogryposis/clinodactyly), suffered a burn, or have disfiguring scars or tumors, our doctors can help. Depending on your individual situation, they devise a treatment plan that helps you look and feel normal, while helping you regain any lost function.

Taking care of your fingers, hands, and arms as soon after an injury occurs and before you lose capabilities gives you the best shot at looking, feeling, and functioning at your best. Call us today for an evaluation or use the online form.

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