Arthroscopic Rotator Cuff Repair


 

According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, about 13.7 million people in the United States sought medical care in 2003 for shoulder problems. The incidence and occurrence of rotator cuff tears increases with each decade. Some studies estimate that after age 50 more than 50% of the population has some degree of rotator cuff tear. Small rotator cuff tears not causing pain or weakness may do well without repair. However, in those patients who have persistent weakness and pain, in our experience, surgical repair using advanced arthroscopic techniques is the most reliable option.

Click here to watch a video of an arthroscopic rotator cuff repair.


Types of Arthroscopic Rotator Cuff Repair

While other forms of treatment are available including therapy, injections, and benign neglect we find that for patients with persistent pain and weakness these options are unpredictable. For rotator cuff tears that are the result of an injury or acute trauma early repair results in the best outcomes. For more discussion about commonly asked questions about the rotator cuff please refer to FAQ: Rotator Cuff Tear and Failed Rotator Cuff Repair.

While other forms of treatment are available including therapy, injections, and benign neglect we find that for patients with persistent pain and weakness these options are unpredictable. For rotator cuff tears that are the result of an injury or acute trauma early repair results in the best outcomes. For more discussion about commonly asked questions about the rotator cuff please refer to FAQ: Rotator Cuff Tear and Failed Rotator Cuff Repair.


Our technique for arthroscopic rotator cuff repair is based on several principles:

  1. Avoid injury to normal tissues.
  2. Restore the normal tension and anatomy of the rotator cuff muscle to allow it to function optimally.
  3. Provide our patients with the most reliable and rapid recovery possible. 


Completed Arthroscopic Rotator Cuff Repair:

  • Massive Rotator Cuff Tear (6cm) seen from the lateral portal.

  • Restoring normal muscle tension means determining the pattern of tear and repairing it anatomically.  Special hooks and instruments allow precise suture placement.

  • Precise placement of sutures is crucial to restoring the normal length and tension in the rotator cuff. The first suture placed and tied is often the “home run” stitch helping everything else fall in place.




  • Completed Anatomic Repair


The following links will open in a new window

The Journal of Bone and Joint Surgery Article: Staged Arthroscopic Rotator Cuff Repair with a Bridging Acellular Human Dermal Graft in the Treatment of Infection Following Open Rotator Cuff Repair

International Journal of Shoulder Surgery: Improving Rotator Cuff Healing Rates Article

Arthroscopic Rotator Cuff Repair Graft Reinforcement Technique

Services We Offer


Hand/Wrist

LEARN MORE →

Sports Injury

LEARN MORE →

 

Nerve Conditions

LEARN MORE →

Reconstructive /Plastic Surgery

LEARN MORE →

 

Microsurgery

LEARN MORE →

Other Conditions We Treat

LEARN MORE →

Our Locations

Choose your preferred location